Why do we sweat?

Why do we sweat?





Why do we sweat only science work hard Sweating stinky sodium, chloride potassium, calcium, and magnesium Eccrine Apocrine glands puberty breast groin

Whenever we work hard or we are nervous or sick, we start sweating. The heart begins to beat faster. Why do we sweat? Where does the sweat suddenly come from?

Sweating can be stinky but it is also a natural cooling process of your body. Our bodies can sweat for various reasons. When your body temperature rises from exercise, heat, stress, or hormone shifts, sweating helps keep your internal temperature at a comfortable 96.6 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Sweat is made up mostly of water but contains sodium, chloride, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. What your sweat is made up of depends on which gland is producing the sweat. There are different types of glands in the human body, but only two are generally recognized:



Eccrine glands:

The eccrine glands produce most of your sweat, especially watery. Acrine sweat, however, does not taste like water, as it contains a small amount of salt, protein, urea, and ammonia. These glands are most dense on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, forehead, and armpits but surround your entire body.

Apocrine glands:

The apocrine glands are larger. They are mostly found in the armpits, groin, and breast area. These are often associated with BO and are produced more frequently after puberty. Since they are close to the hair follicles, they typically smell the worst. This is why it is said that stress sweat smells worst than other sweat.

 A person who is not very healthy loses more sodium in his sweat than a healthy person. But everyone's sweat is a bit different. The amount of sweat you produce depends on several factors Body size, Age, Muscle mass, Health status, Fitness level, etc. 

In addition to just cooling down, there are various reasons why our bodies start producing sweat. The nervous system regulates sweating related to exercise and body temperature. It triggers the Eccrine gland to sweat. Spicy foods can stimulate our sweat glands.

Another thing that can increase sweating is consuming large amounts of alcohol. Haimovich explains that alcohol can speed up your heartbeat and dilate blood vessels, which also occurs during physical activity. This reaction, in turn, creates thoughts in your body that it needs to cool itself by sweating.



Theory of Relativity - Only Science

Theory of relativity Einstein's theory of relativity is one of the most exciting theories in physics. only science 360 physics learn some more GTR STR
 


Theory of Relativity

Einstein's theory of relativity is one of the most exciting theories in physics. This theory created a new era in the world of physics. According to this theory, space, time, and object or mass are not absolute but relative.

Albert Einstein introduced this theory in 1905 by introducing the theory of special relativity. Scientist Sir Isaac Newton held space, time, and mass to be neutral, meaning that their values would always be constant. But Albert Einstein said that space, time, and mass are not neutral, they are variable.

There are basically two theories of relativity:
  1. General Theory of Relativity: General relativity or the general theory of relativity refers to the geometric theory of gravitation discovered by the scientist Albert Einstein in 1915-1918.
  2. Special Theory of Relativity: Special relativity or the special theory of relativity is a generally accepted and strongly supported theory of the interrelationship of space and time. Special relativity is considered a special form of general relativity.

Space, time, and mass:

Space:


Sir Isaac Newton: According to the scientist Newton, space is an absolute thing that resides within itself. It is not related to anything outside and is not affected by the environment. For example, the length of an object does not depend on the motion of the object or the observer and is unchanged in the stationary state.

Albert Einstein: The scientist Einstein proved that the three basic quantities (space, time, mass) of classical mechanics change with speed. The length of an object in motion is smaller than the length of a stationary object. Thus the length of the object is compressed with motion.


Time:

Sir Isaac Newton: According to the scientist Newton, time is inherently an absolute quantity, which depends on something outside. Thus time is universal which does not depend on the motion of the object or the observer.

Albert Einstein: An event occurring in an inert or stationary structure can be observed from any other structure moving relative to that structure and it can be seen that the time interval between events has increased. This is called time dilation. Thus time expands with speed.


Mass:


Sir Isaac Newton: In Newtonian mechanics, the mass of an object is a fundamental quantity that is not dependent on its motion.

Albert Einstein: As the object moves, its mass increases. When an object is in a stationary state, its mass increases when it is in motion. When an object has a moving mass m, a stationary mass m', and an object moving at a velocity v

m = m'/(sqrt(1-(sqr(v)/sqr(c))))


Computer Science

Computer Science and Its areas



Computer Science is the study of computers and computational systems. Unlike electrical and computer engineering, computer science deal mostly with software and software systems which include their theory, design, development, and application.


Principal areas of study within Computer Science include artificial intelligence(Ai), computer systems, and networks, security, database systems, human-computer interaction, vision and graphics, numerical analysis, programming languages, software engineering, bioinformatics, and theory of computing.

Artificial Intelligence(AI):

Unlike the natural intelligence displayed by humans and animals(which involves consciousness and emotionality), Artificial intelligence (AI) is intelligence demonstrated by machines. Artificial intelligence was founded as an academic discipline in 1955. and since then has experienced several waves of optimism, disappointment, and the loss of funding (known as an "AI winter"), followed by new approaches, success, and renewed funding. Artificial intelligence once again attracted widespread global attention after Alpha Go successfully defeated a professional Go player in 2015. Now AI techniques have experienced a resurgence following concurrent advances in computer power, large amounts of data, and theoretical understanding; and AI techniques have become an essential part of the technology industry, helping to solve many challenging problems in computer science, software engineering, and operations research.

Computer systems:

Computer System is a collection of entities(hardware, software, and liveware) that are designed to receive, process, manage and present information in a meaningful format.

  • Computer hardware: Computer hardware Are physical parts/ intangible parts of a computer. eg Input devices, output devices, central processing unit, and storage devices
  • Computer software: Computer software is also known as programs or applications. They are classified into two classes namely - system software and application software
  • Liveware: Liveware is the computer user. Also, known as orgwareor the humanware. The user commands the computer system to execute instructions.

Networks:

A network is a collection of computers, servers, mainframes, network devices, peripherals, or other devices connected to one another to allow the sharing of data. As an example Internet connects millions of people all over the world. There are mainly four types of computer networks.
  • LAN(Local Area Network)
  • PAN(Personal Area Network)
  • MAN(Metropolitan Area Network)
  • WAN(Wide Area Network)

Security:

Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security is the protection of computer systems and networks from the theft of or damage to their hardware, software, or electronic data, as well as from the disruption or misdirection of the services they provide. (Wikipedia)

Database systems:

A database is an organized collection of structured information, or data, typically stored electronically in a computer system. A database refers to a set of related data and the way it is organized. This data is accessed by a Database Management System (DBMS) which consists of an integrated set of computer software that allows users to interact with one or more databases and provides access to all of the data contained in the database.

Human-Computer interaction:

Human-computer interaction(HCI) is a multidisciplinary field of study focusing on the design of computer technology and, in particular, the interaction between humans and computers.

Vision and graphics:

Visual computing is a generic term for all computer science disciplines dealing with images and 3D models, such as computer graphics, image processing, visualization, computer vision, virtual and augmented reality, and video processing.

Numerical analysis:

Numerical analysis, an area of mathematics and computer science that creates, analyzes, and implements algorithms for obtaining numerical solutions to problems involving continuous variables. Numerical analysis is concerned with all aspects of the numerical solution of a problem, from the theoretical development and understanding of numerical methods to their practical implementation as reliable and efficient computer programs.

Programming languages:

Computer programming languages allow us to give instructions to a computer in a language the computer understands. Just as many human-based languages exist, there are an array of computer programming languages that programmers can use to communicate with a computer. Some of those languages are:

Software engineering:

Software engineering is a detailed study of engineering to the design, development and maintenance of software. Software engineering was introduced to address the issues of low-quality software projects.

Bioinformatics:

Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field bringing together biology, computer science, mathematics, statistics, and information theory to analyze biological data for interpretation and prediction. One popular approach is to develop a predictive computer model from a database of known gene sequences and use the resulting model to predict where genes are likely to be in newly generated sequence information.

Theory of computing:

The theory of computation is the branch that deals with what problems can be solved on a model of computation, using an algorithm, how efficiently they can be solved, or to what degree (e.g., approximate solutions versus precise ones).

Blender 2.9+ shortcuts

Blender Shortcuts


Here are all the commands which are universally accepted as Blender shortcuts across all the Blender versions. Here are all the most commonly used Blender shortcut keys used by Blender users across the world

General Shortcuts




Function Shortcut
Open toolbar T
Open properties N
Add object/Node Shift+A
Delete X or Delete
Search for function F3
Move G
Scale S
Rotate R

Move, Scale or Rotate along the axis

G, S, or R then X/Y/Z

Move, Scale or Rotate along local axis

G, S, or R then X+X/Y+Y/Z+Z

Trackball Rotate

R+R

Precise movement

Shift (Hold)

Incremental movement

Ctrl (Hold)

Duplicate

Shift+D

Duplicate Linked

Alt+D

Hide

H

Unhide All

Alt+H

Hide All except selected

Shift+H

Annotate

D(Hold)+LMB(Drag)

Erase Annotation

D(Hold)+RMB(Drag)

Quick Favs Menu

Q

Navigation 3D viewport



blender shortcuts General Shortcuts 2.9+ 2020 Blender versions 3d windows shortcut science only science all shortcuts blender tips and tricks how to
Pie of View.



Function Shortcut
Orbit MMB(Drag)
Pan Shift+MMB(Drag)
Zoom in/out Scroll or Shift+MMB(Drag)
Fly Shift+~
Get out of the Flying mode RMB
Isolate Numpad /
Focus Numpad .
Camera Numpad 0
Front view

Numpad 1

Go Down

Numpad 2

Side View

Numpad 3

Perspective-Orthographic

Numpad 5

Top view

Numpad 7

Go Up

Numpad 8

Opposite view

Numpad 9

Pie view menu

~

Fast view switch

Alt+MMB(Drag)

Show all objects

Home

Zoom to region

Shift+B

Windows keyboard shortcuts

Keyboard Shortcuts

Computer keyboard shortcuts Windows keyboard shortcuts CTRL+A alt 0169 Interesting keyboard shortcuts how to key board shortcuts file menu MICROSOFT®


CTRL+A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Select All

CTRL+C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy

CTRL+X. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cut

CTRL+V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paste

CTRL+Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Undo

CTRL+B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bold

CTRL+U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Underline

CTRL+I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Italic

F1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Help

F2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . Rename selected object

F3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . Find all files

F4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . Opens file list drop-down in dialogs

F5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Refresh current window

F6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shifts focus in Windows Explorer

F10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Activates menu bar options

ALT+TAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cycles between open applications

ALT+F4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quit program, close current window

ALT+F6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Switch between current program windows

ALT+ENTER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Opens properties dialog

ALT+SPACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System menu for current window

ALT+¢ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . opens drop-down lists in dialog boxes

BACKSPACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . Switch to parent folder

CTRL+ESC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Opens Start menu

CTRL+ALT+DEL . . . . . . . . . . Opens task manager, reboots the computer

CTRL+TAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Move through property tabs

CTRL+SHIFT+DRAG . . . . . . . Create shortcut (also right-click, drag)

CTRL+DRAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy File

ESC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cancel last function

SHIFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Press/hold SHIFT, insert CD-ROM to bypass auto-play

SHIFT+DRAG . . . . . . . . . . . . Move file

SHIFT+F10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Opens context menu (same as right-click)

SHIFT+DELETE . . . . . . . . . . . Full wipe delete (bypasses Recycle Bin)

ALT+underlined letter . . . . Opens the corresponding menu

PC Keyboard Shortcuts

Document Cursor Controls

HOME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to beginning of line or far left of field or screen

END . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to end of line, or far right of field or screen

CTRL+HOME . . . . . . . . to the top

CTRL+END . . . . . . . . . . to the bottom

PAGE UP . . . . . . . . . . . . moves document or dialog box up one page

PAGE DOWN . . . . . . . . moves document or dialog down one page

ARROW KEYS . . . . . . . move focus in documents, dialogs, etc.

CTRL+ > . . . . . . . . . . . . next word

CTRL+SHIFT+ > . . . . . . selects word

Windows Explorer Tree Control

Numeric Keypad * . . . Expand all under the current selection

Numeric Keypad + . . . Expands current selection

Numeric Keypad – . . . Collapses current selection

¦ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Expand current selection or go to first child

‰ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collapse current selection or go to parent

Special Characters

‘ Opening single quote . . . alt 0145

’ Closing single quote . . . . alt 0146

“ Opening double quote . . . alt 0147

“ Closing double quote. . . . alt 0148

– En dash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0150

— Em dash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0151

… Ellipsis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0133

• Bullet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0149

® Registration Mark . . . . . . . alt 0174

© Copyright . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0169

™ Trademark . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0153

° Degree symbol. . . . . . . . . alt 0176

¢ Cent sign . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0162

1⁄4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0188

1⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0189

3⁄4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0190

é . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0233

É . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0201

ñ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0241

÷ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . alt 0247

File menu options in current program

Alt + E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edit options in current program

F1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Universal help (for all programs)

Ctrl + A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Select all text

Ctrl + X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Cut selected item

Shift + Del  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cut selected item

Ctrl + C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Copy selected item

Ctrl + Ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Copy selected item

Ctrl + V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Paste

Shift + Ins  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paste

Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Go to beginning of current line

Ctrl + Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Go to beginning of document

End  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Go to end of current line

Ctrl + End  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Go to end of document

Shift + Home  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Highlight from current position to beginning of line

Shift + End  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Highlight from current position to end of line

Ctrl + f  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Move one word to the left at a time

Ctrl + g  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Move one word to the right at a time

MICROSOFT® WINDOWS® SHORTCUT KEYS

Alt + Tab  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Switch between open applications

Alt + Shift + Tab  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Switch backwards between open applications

Alt + Print Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Create screen shot for current program

Ctrl + Alt + Del . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Reboot/Windows® task manager

Ctrl + Esc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Bring up start menu

Alt + Esc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Switch between applications on taskbar

F2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Rename selected icon

F3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Start find from desktop

F4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open the drive selection when browsing

F5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Refresh contents

Alt + F4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Close current open program

Ctrl + F4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Close window in program

Ctrl + Plus Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatically adjust widths of all columns in Windows Explorer

Alt + Enter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open properties window of selected icon or program

Shift + F10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Simulate right-click on selected item

Shift + Del . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Delete programs/files permanently

Holding Shift During Bootup Boot safe mode or bypass system files

Holding Shift During Bootup When putting in an audio CD, will prevent CD Player from playing

WINKEY SHORTCUTS

WINKEY + D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Bring desktop to the top of other windows

WINKEY + M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Minimize all windows

WINKEY + SHIFT + M  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Undo the minimize done by WINKEY + M and WINKEY + D

WINKEY + E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open Microsoft Explorer

WINKEY + Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Cycle through open programs on taskbar

WINKEY + F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Display the Windows® Search/Find feature

WINKEY + CTRL + F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Display the search for computers window

WINKEY + F1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Display the Microsoft® Windows® help

WINKEY + R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open the run window

WINKEY + Pause /Break  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open the system properties window

WINKEY + U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open utility manager

WINKEY + L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Lock the computer (Windows XP® & later)

OUTLOOK® SHORTCUT KEYS

Alt + S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Send the email

Ctrl + C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Copy selected text

Ctrl + X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Cut selected text

Ctrl + P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open print dialog box

Ctrl + K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Complete name/email typed in address bar

Ctrl + B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Bold highlighted selection

Ctrl + I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Italicize highlighted selection

Ctrl + U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Underline highlighted selection

Ctrl + R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Reply to an email

Ctrl + F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Forward an email

Ctrl + N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Create a new email

Ctrl + Shift + A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Create a new appointment to your calendar

Ctrl + Shift + O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open the outbox

Ctrl + Shift + I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open the inbox

Ctrl + Shift + K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Add a new task

Ctrl + Shift + C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Create a new contact

Ctrl + Shift+ J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Create a new journal entry

WORD® SHORTCUT KEYS

Ctrl + A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Select all contents of the page

Ctrl + B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Bold highlighted selection

Ctrl + C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Copy selected text

Ctrl + X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Cut selected text

Ctrl + N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open new/blank document

Ctrl + O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open options

Ctrl + P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open the print window

Ctrl + F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Open find box

Ctrl + I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Italicize highlighted selection

Ctrl + K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Insert link

Ctrl + U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Underline highlighted selection

Ctrl + V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Paste

Ctrl + Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Redo the last action performed

Ctrl + Z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Undo last action

Ctrl + G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Find and replace options

Ctrl + H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Find and replace options

Ctrl + J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Justify paragraph alignment

Ctrl + L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Align selected text or line to the left

Ctrl + Q . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Align selected paragraph to the left

Ctrl + E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Align selected


©Career Help BD

Python Syntax 3




Name of syntaxWhat it doesExampleExecute
nameofliist.sort()To sort items in ascending ordern = [1, 4, 6, 7, 9]
n.sort()
print(n)
[1, 4, 6, 7, 9]
nameofliist.reverse()To sort items in descending ordero = [1, 4, 6, 7, 9]
o.sort()
o.reverse()
print(o)
[9, 7, 6, 4, 1]
() ParenthesisTo create a tuple. It is almost the same as a list. Just you can not edit it from outside. But you can read data from outside. print('') # for a space between line
p = ("alpha codist", "Corona Attack", 6, 9, 8)
# -->> p.append("Corona Attack is a game") # This returns error
print(p)
 ('alpha codist', 'Corona Attack', 6, 9, 8)
defTo define a function.  def alphacodist():
print("Alpha Codist is the best...")
alphacodist()
 Alpha Codist is the best...
 {}To create a dictionary print('') # for a space between line
q = {
"Easy": 5,
"Normal": 10,
"Hard": 15
}
print(q["Easy"])
 
 5
 range() to get a range. print('') # for a space between line
for r in range(0, 9):
print(r)
 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
 quit()to quit code. print("Want to quit??")
quit()
print("I called quit!!!")
 Want to quit??
 return To return something. def alpha():
s = "Alpha Codist is the best..."
return s

print(alpha())
 Alpha Codist is the best...



Python syntax 2

Python syntax 2 programming coding free course code C C++ tutorial HTML CSS Physics Chemistry Biology Electricity science only astronomy software news

Python syntax 2


Name of syntax
What it does
Example
Execute
for()
Creating a loop
for a word in "Alpha Codist":
print(word)
A
l
p
h
a
C
o
d
i
s
t
[] bracket
To create a list
d = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist']
print(d)
[1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist']
d = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist']
for items in d:
print(items)
1
4
Alpha
Codist
nameofliist.append()
Adds item on list in last
e = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist']
e.append('is the best')
print(e)
[1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'is the best']
nameofliist.insert(where you want, what you want)
Adds item anywhere on list
f = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Is the best']
f.insert(3, 'Codist')
print(f)
[1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
nameofliist.remove()
Removes item from list
g = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
g.remove(1)
print(g)
[4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
nameofliist.clear()
Clears the whole list
h = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
h.clear()
print(h)
[]
nameofliist.pop()
Removes the last item from the list
i = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
i.pop()
print(i)
[1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist']
nameofliist.index(the item you want to check)
Checks items index
j = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
j.index('Alpha')
print(j)
2(The index of ‘Alpha’)
k = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
k.index(5)
print(k)
ValueError: 5 is not in list
Print(Youritem In listnumber)
Checks if the item is in the list
l = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Is the best']
print(5 in l)
False
nameofliist.count()
To count occurrences of item
m = [1, 4, 'Alpha', 'Codist', 'Alpha', 'Is the best']
print(m.count('Alpha'))
2


print()- Python

print() is used to print something(Strings, Integers, boolean, etc.).


alpha = "Alpha Codist is the best"
codist = 5689
v=5689

print(alpha) # returns Alpha Codist is the best
print(codist) # returns 5689
print(codist == v) # returns True

Result:

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Printing strings:

To print strings you will have to use "" inside the print() statement.


AC = "Alpha Codist"

print("Alpha Codist is the best.")
print(AC)


Result:

Python Problems, programming, java, software, PHP, C programming, programming languages, visual, Pascal, Perl, XML program, UNIX, cyber program, C++, HTML, CSS, Python syntax, software, what is computer, programming, programming languages, computer programming, what is coding, what is programming, contract programming, need a programmer, cyber program, tmbmnadim, Alpha Codist, python, Alpha Codist, blogger, Python problems to solve, pythopn free corse, get python corse for free, Learn Python for free


Printing Integers:

To print Integers you can simply enter the numeric value or you can calculate.


codist = 5689

print(59*45)  # returns 2655
print(codist) # returns 5689

Result:

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Printing boolean:

You can directly print boolean by entering a boolean between the parenthesis or you can compare to integers and see if your comparison is True or False. This is used to check codes.


Alpha = 59*45
Codist = 2655

print(Alpha == Codist)  # returns 2655
print(True) # returns 5689

Result:

Python Problems, programming, java, software, PHP, C programming, programming languages, visual, Pascal, Perl, XML program, UNIX, cyber program, C++, HTML, CSS, Python syntax, software, what is computer, programming, programming languages, computer programming, what is coding, what is programming, contract programming, need a programmer, cyber program, tmbmnadim, Alpha Codist, python, Alpha Codist, blogger, Python problems to solve, pythopn free corse, get python corse for free, Learn Python for free


Download Python and PyCharm

Welcome to Only Science 360. To do python programming you must need Python. And make it better you might want to use PyCharm. Here are the download links of Python and PyCharm.


Click This link to Download both Python and PyCharm










See how to install Python and PyCharm.



Python Syntax

Python Syntax list Learn python programming Free python course coding tutorial  software PHP Physics Chemistry Biology Electricity only science

Python Syntax



Name of syntax
What it does
Example
Execute
Prints strings
print(“Hello World!!!”)
Hello World!!!
Prints Integers
print(50*90) or
print(4500)
print(‘*’ * 10)
4500
**********
Prints Boolean Etc.
print(50=50)
True
Prints variables
a = 50
print(a)
50
Input()
Takes input from the user
name = input(“Name: ”)
print(‘Hi’ + name)
Name: Alpha Codist
Hi Alpha Codist
int()
Transforms numeric strings to integers
(1) a = “40”
print(a * 3)
(2) b= ‘20’
a =int(b)
print(a * 3)
(1) 404040
(2) 60
str()
Converts to strings
(1) a = 40
print(a * 3)
(2) b= 20
a =str(b)
print(a * 3)
(1) 120
(2) 202020
import
For importing modules
Import math
(This imports the math module)
if():
else:
For comparing
a = 10
if (a == 10):
print('a is equal to ten')
else:
print('a is not equal to ten')
a is equal to ten
b = 9
if (b == 10):
print('b is equal to ten')
else:
print('b is not equal to ten')
b is not equal to ten
while():
else:
Creating loop
c = input("c: ")
c = int(c)
while (c < 10):
print("c is less than equal to ten")
c += 1
else:
print("c is too large")
c: 5
c is less than equal to ten
c is less than equal to ten
c is less than equal to ten
c is less than equal to ten
c is less than equal to ten
c is too large

Source: Alpha Codist

Previous

15 amazing science facts

 15 amazing science facts

15 amazing science facts The Eiffel Tower can be 15 cm taller during the summer A teaspoonful of neutron star would weigh 6 billion tons


1. Babies have around 100 more bones than adults

At birth, Babies have about 300 bones, with cartilage between many of them. This extra flexibility helps them pass through the birth canal and also allows for rapid growth. With age, many of the bones fuse, leaving 206 bones that make up an average adult skeleton.


2. The Eiffel Tower can be 15 cm taller during the summer

When a substance is heated up, its particles move more and it takes up a larger volume – this is known as thermal expansion. Conversely, a drop in temperature causes it to contract again. The mercury level inside a thermometer, for example, rises and falls as the mercury’s volume changes with the ambient temperature. This effect is most dramatic in gases but occurs in liquids and solids such as iron too. For this reason, large structures such as bridges are built with expansion joints which allow them some leeway to expand and contract without causing any damage.


3. 20% of Earth’s oxygen is produced by the Amazon rain-forest

Our atmosphere is made up of roughly 78 per cent nitrogen and 21 per cent oxygen, with various other gases present in small amounts. The vast majority of living organisms on Earth need oxygen to survive, converting it into carbon dioxide as they breathe. Thankfully, plants continually replenish our planet’s oxygen levels through photosynthesis. During this process, carbon dioxide and water are converted into energy, releasing oxygen as a by-product. Covering 5.5 million square kilometres (2.1 million square miles), the Amazon rain-forest cycles a significant proportion of the Earth’s oxygen, absorbing large quantities of carbon dioxide at the same time.


4. Some metals are so reactive that they explode on contact with water

There are certain metals – including potassium, sodium, lithium, rubidium and cesium – that are so reactive that they oxidize (or tarnish) instantly when exposed to air. They can even produce explosions when dropped in water! All elements strive to be chemically stable – in other words, to have a full outer electron shell. To achieve this, metals tend to shed electrons. The alkali metals have only one electron on their outer shell, making them ultra-keen to pass on this unwanted passenger to another element via bonding. As a result they form compounds with other elements so readily that they don’t exist independently in nature.


5. A teaspoonful of neutron star would weigh 6 billion tons

A neutron star is the remnants of a massive star that has run out of fuel. The dying star explodes in a supernova while its core collapses in on itself due to gravity, forming a super-dense neutron star. Astronomers measure the mind-mindbogglingly large masses of stars or galaxies in solar masses, with one solar mass equal to the Sun’s mass (that is, 2 x 1030 kilograms/4.4 x 1030 pounds). Typical neutron stars have a mass of up to three solar masses, which is crammed into a sphere with a radius of approximately ten kilometres (6.2 miles) – resulting in some of the densest matter in the known universe.


6. Hawaii moves 7.5 cm closer to Alaska every year

The Earth’s crust is split into gigantic pieces called tectonic plates. These plates are in constant motion, propelled by currents in the Earth’s upper mantle. Hot, less-dense rock rises before cooling and sinking, giving rise to circular convection currents which act like giant conveyor belts, slowly shifting the tectonic plates above them. Hawaii sits in the middle of the Pacific Plate, which is slowly drifting north-west towards the North American Plate, back to Alaska. The plates’ pace is comparable to the speed at which our fingernails grow.


7. Chalk is made from trillions of microscopic plankton fossils

Tiny single-celled algae called Coccolithophores have lived in Earth’s oceans for 200 million years. Unlike any other marine plant, they surround themselves with minuscule plates of calcite (chocoholics). Just under 100 million years ago, conditions were just right for coccolithophores to accumulate in a thick layer coating ocean floors in a white ooze. As further sediment built up on top, the pressure compressed the coccoliths to form rock, creating chalk deposits such as the white cliffs of Dover. Coccolithophores are just one of many prehistoric species that have been immortalized in fossil form, but how do we know how old they are? Over time, rock forms in horizontal layers, leaving older rocks at the bottom and younger rocks near the top. By studying the type of rock in which a fossil is found paleontologists can roughly guess its age. Carbon dating estimates a fossil’s age more precisely, based on the rate of decay of radioactive elements such as carbon-14.


8. In 2.3 billion years it will be too hot for life to exist on Earth

Over the coming hundreds of millions of years, the Sun will continue to get progressively brighter and hotter. In just over 2 billion years, temperatures will be high enough to evaporate our oceans, making life on Earth impossible. Our planet will become a vast desert similar to Mars today. As it expands into a red giant in the following few billion years, scientists predict that the Sun will finally engulf Earth altogether, spelling the definite end for our planet.


9. Polar bears are nearly undetectable by infrared cameras

Thermal cameras detect the heat lost by a subject as infrared, but polar bears are experts at conserving heat. The bears keep warm due to a thick layer of blubber under the skin. Add to this a dense fur coat and they can endure the chilliest Arctic day.


10. It takes 8 minutes, 19 seconds for light to travel from the Sun to the Earth

In space, light travels at 300,000 kilometres (186,000 miles) per second. Even at this breakneck speed, covering the 150 million odd kilometres (93 million miles) between us and the Sun takes considerable time. And eight minutes is still very little compared to the five and a half hours it takes for the Sun’s light to reach Pluto.


11. If you took out all the empty space in our atoms, the human race could fit in the volume of a sugar cube

The atoms that make up the world around us seem solid but are in fact over 99.99999 per cent empty space. An atom consists of a tiny, dense nucleus surrounded by a cloud of electrons, spread over a proportionately vast area. This is because as well as being particles, electrons act like waves. Electrons can only exist where the crests and troughs of these waves add up correctly. And instead of existing in one point, each electron’s location is spread over a range of probabilities – an orbital. They thus occupy a huge amount of space.


12. Stomach acid is strong enough to dissolve stainless steel

Your stomach digests food thanks to highly corrosive hydrochloric acid with a pH of 2 to 3. This acid also attacks your stomach lining, which protects itself by secreting an alkali bicarbonate solution. The lining still needs to be replaced continually, and it entirely renews itself every four days.


13. The Earth is a giant magnet

Earth’s inner core is a sphere of solid iron, surrounded by liquid iron. Variations in temperature and density create currents in this iron, which in turn produce electrical currents. Lined up by the Earth’s spin, these currents combine to create a magnetic field, used by compass needles worldwide.


14. Venus is the only planet to spin clockwise

Our Solar System started off as a swirling cloud of dust and gas which eventually collapsed into a spinning disc with the Sun at its center. Because of this common origin, all the planets move around the Sun in the same direction and on roughly the same plane. They also all spin in the same direction (counterclockwise if observed from ‘above’) – except Uranus and Venus. Uranus spins on its side, while Venus defiantly spins in the complete opposite direction. The most likely cause of these planetary oddballs are gigantic asteroids which knocked them off course in the distant past.


15. A flea can accelerate faster than the Space Shuttle

A jumping flea reaches dizzying heights of about eight centimetres (three inches) in a millisecond. Acceleration is the change in speed of an object over time, often measured in ‘g’s, with one g equal to the acceleration caused by gravity on Earth (9.8 metres/32.2 feet per square second). Fleas experience 100 g, while the Space Shuttle peaked at around 5 g. The flea’s secret is a stretchy rubber-like protein which allows it to store and release energy like a spring.


Source: how it works daily

Nanotechnology - Only Science 360

Nano-Tech

Nano-Tech Definition nano-meter How it started Aplication of Nano-tech science, only science technology Physics Chemistry Biology Electricity learn


Definition


A nanometer is a billionth of a meter. Nanotechnology or Nano-tech is manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supra-molecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macro-scale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. Nano-science and nanotechnology are the study and application of extremely small things and it can be used across all the other science fields, such as biology, chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Which defined nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nano meters.

How it started?



The ideas and concepts behind Nano-science and Nanotechnology started with a talk entitled “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” by physicist Richard Feynman at an American Physical Society meeting at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) on December 29, 1959. It was long before the term nanotechnology was used. Feynman described a process in which scientists would be able to manipulate and control individual atoms and molecules.  Over a decade later, Professor Norio Taniguchi coined the term nanotechnology, in his explorations of ultra precision machining. It wasn't until 1981, with the development of the scanning tunneling microscope that could see individual atoms, that modern nanotechnology began.

Aplication of Nano-tech

There are many uses of nano-tech. Nanotechnology is being used in developing countries to help treat disease and prevent health issues and The umbrella term for this kind of nanotechnology is Nano-medicine. Nanotechnology is also being developed for application to a variety of industrial and purification processes. 

Nanoscale surface treatments of fabrics can provide lightweight ballistic energy deflection in personal body armor, or can help them resist wrinkling, staining, and bacterial growth. Clear nanoscale films on eyeglasses, computer and camera displays, windows, and other surfaces can make them water-repellent and residue-repellent, anti-reflective, self-cleaning, resistant to ultraviolet or resistant to infrared light, anti-fog, anti-microbial, scratch-resistant, or electrically conductive.Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene-editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency. Transistors, the basic switches that enable all modern computing, have gotten smaller and smaller through nanotechnology. Researchers are investigating carbon nanotube “scrubbers” and membranes to separate carbon dioxide from power plant exhaust.


Source: nano.gov and Wikipedia